Texas Winter 2020-2021

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captainbarbossa19
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7581 Postby captainbarbossa19 » Fri Feb 26, 2021 12:42 am

captainbarbossa19 wrote:
Brent wrote:I'm back home but snow last week lightning this week :spam:


Thunder in February, frost in April. :)


On a different note, I am not sure I mentioned this, but I had thundersnow last Monday.
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7582 Postby Ntxw » Fri Feb 26, 2021 1:41 am

Rain is training in N TX.
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7583 Postby somethingfunny » Fri Feb 26, 2021 1:55 am

rwfromkansas wrote:So I just noticed the quality of the Love Field airport radar on RadarScope is much better than in the past. Did they update it? Also, it seems to update every minute!


It's not as good as what we've gotten used to since the NEXRAD Dual-pol upgrades but it'll do here in a pinch for sure. It's kind of neat switching back and forth between TDAL & KGRK.

Does anyone know why these radars have been going down so frequently lately? GRK, DYX, and SJT were all down during last Wednesday's storm, and today SJT is still down, along with FWD... What gives? I thought we already did the planned maintenance outages a couple of months ago
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7584 Postby Brent » Fri Feb 26, 2021 1:59 am

Im trying to remember the last time I saw this much lightning :double:

And I don't get why the radar is always down... Im sure it'll be working in August when it's 100 and sunny all month
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7585 Postby rwfromkansas » Fri Feb 26, 2021 9:14 am

Rained for hours. Got 2.5 inches IMBY. Did not expect that.
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7586 Postby Iceresistance » Fri Feb 26, 2021 10:09 am

Early March looks kinda like a severe weather potental for Northern Texas & Along I-35 in Oklahoma . . .

Forum on Storm Season 2021: viewtopic.php?f=24&t=121693
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Bill 2015 & Beta 2020

Winter 2020-2021 :jacket:

Also many Oklahoma Supercells

Winter posts are focused mainly for Oklahoma & Texas

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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7587 Postby Ntxw » Fri Feb 26, 2021 3:26 pm

bubba hotep wrote:
Ntxw wrote:Barring some kind of monstrous heat wave this week, February for DFW is 34.6F so far for the monthly average. It is going to be the first sub 40F month since December 2000. I like to use that as a metric for an exceptionally cold month. Even the cold winters of 09-10 and 13-14 did not feature such a month.

Of modern history here are the few months that have achieved such a status. Some elite winters. One subtle common theme, except for the late 70s..they are more likely to occur in a...La Nina than El Nino. Often accompanied by a severe -EPO or -AO.

February 2021...?

December 2000
December 1989
January 1985
January 1984
December 1983
January 1979
February 1978
January 1978 <- 33.8 (record coldest month for DFW)
January 1977
January 1963
January 1962
January 1949
January 1940
January 1930
February 1929
January 1918
December 1914
December 1909
February 1905
January 1905
February 1899


One thing is certain, all of the 0F (there are only 5 including this year) or lower readings have occurred on years exclusive to this list.

Edit: 2021 is also joins 1899, 1918, and 1989 with 2 top 10 lowest temperature readings on record. -2F and 4F.


This will be an elite month when it comes to cold but the Southern Plains were already busting a lot of winter outlooks before this cold snap put the nail in the coffin of the warm & dry Southern Plains winter forecast.


Of course the last stretch would be so warm it has brought up the average now to 39F and with the weekend forecast, it may cross 40F coming up just short once again (33F freezing streak bust?). Why of course it will! It is DFW after all.

Doesn't take away from the severity of the cold snap but once again given the chance make a mark in the books, we come up just short. :roll:
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7588 Postby richtrav » Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:02 am

psyclone wrote:Any insight as to the extent of damage to the hardy (and not so hardy) palms and semi tropical plants in coastal/south Texas? That was some insane cold, even for tougher species. I know there are some royal palms down around Brownsville and they really don't like cold.


Yeah I can answer that. It is turning out to be pretty hard on them, you are right they don’t like it. Large royal palms in the middle of Brownsville have the best shot at making it, they had the warmest minima (24 at one downtown site) and were in that critical mid-20s range for less time than the rest of the area. Even there they have badly burned foliage but at least there is more green left in the stems. If they’re too far gone the tissue in the stem dies causing the leaf to collapse. They may or may not recover, we were flirting with what their extermination point was in Florida in the 1980s. Other tropical palms that are not as sturdy are gone, their skinnier trunks are already bleeding sap. Pygmy dates are burned even in Brownsville, I don’t know how many will survive, probably the majority of ones not fully exposed to the elements, they’re a bit tougher. Aside from palms the most tender stuff is going to take a big hit either to the ground or large diameter wood (royal poincianas, ornamental figs, mangoes, avocados, etc).

North of inner Brownsville the damage is extending into more subtropical plants as well. Some plants that are completely safe most winters (such as queen palms) have recently begun to show scorch but it’s variable and uneven, some look decent while others are straw. Same with ponytails and tropical yucca. These should recover. Citrus got scorched in the fields but they hopefully will not have extensive wood damage, in yards they look a lot better except for the limes. All in all this is consistent with some of the hardest freezes from the first half of the 20th century, when the citrus industry in the state was forced south of the King Ranch. Back then frosts were more frequent and true tropicals were planted on a more limited basis, with people preferring subtropicals that could take a little cold. At this time most subtropicals (bottlebrushes, eucalypts, Mexican fan palms, kapoks/shaving brush trees, etc) appear to have survived a brush with death. But tender shrubs like crotons or ixoras will have to be replaced if they weren’t covered. Frost cloth and/or thick painter’s plastic worked wonders on tropicals if they could be covered from top to bottom, no heating was needed.

The good news is that the area doesn’t look post-apocalyptic the way it did after the disaster of the 1983 freeze. This was more like 1930. Now north of the King Ranch the damage to tender and semi-hardy unprotected plants is probably going to be much more extensive given their lows.
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7589 Postby psyclone » Sat Feb 27, 2021 1:01 pm

richtrav wrote:
psyclone wrote:Any insight as to the extent of damage to the hardy (and not so hardy) palms and semi tropical plants in coastal/south Texas? That was some insane cold, even for tougher species. I know there are some royal palms down around Brownsville and they really don't like cold.


Yeah I can answer that. It is turning out to be pretty hard on them, you are right they don’t like it. Large royal palms in the middle of Brownsville have the best shot at making it, they had the warmest minima (24 at one downtown site) and were in that critical mid-20s range for less time than the rest of the area. Even there they have badly burned foliage but at least there is more green left in the stems. If they’re too far gone the tissue in the stem dies causing the leaf to collapse. They may or may not recover, we were flirting with what their extermination point was in Florida in the 1980s. Other tropical palms that are not as sturdy are gone, their skinnier trunks are already bleeding sap. Pygmy dates are burned even in Brownsville, I don’t know how many will survive, probably the majority of ones not fully exposed to the elements, they’re a bit tougher. Aside from palms the most tender stuff is going to take a big hit either to the ground or large diameter wood (royal poincianas, ornamental figs, mangoes, avocados, etc).

North of inner Brownsville the damage is extending into more subtropical plants as well. Some plants that are completely safe most winters (such as queen palms) have recently begun to show scorch but it’s variable and uneven, some look decent while others are straw. Same with ponytails and tropical yucca. These should recover. Citrus got scorched in the fields but they hopefully will not have extensive wood damage, in yards they look a lot better except for the limes. All in all this is consistent with some of the hardest freezes from the first half of the 20th century, when the citrus industry in the state was forced south of the King Ranch. Back then frosts were more frequent and true tropicals were planted on a more limited basis, with people preferring subtropicals that could take a little cold. At this time most subtropicals (bottlebrushes, eucalypts, Mexican fan palms, kapoks/shaving brush trees, etc) appear to have survived a brush with death. But tender shrubs like crotons or ixoras will have to be replaced if they weren’t covered. Frost cloth and/or thick painter’s plastic worked wonders on tropicals if they could be covered from top to bottom, no heating was needed.

The good news is that the area doesn’t look post-apocalyptic the way it did after the disaster of the 1983 freeze. This was more like 1930. Now north of the King Ranch the damage to tender and semi-hardy unprotected plants is probably going to be much more extensive given their lows.


Thanks so much for this and all the other detailed responses. Wishing nothing but the best for you guys out there. I felt almost guilty watching this insanity from my warm perch on the other side of the gulf. I'm sitting at latitude 28 and the coldest we got this winter was about 40 or so but I know it's just a matter of time before we pay rent. All the best to club Texas recovery.
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7590 Postby Iceresistance » Sun Feb 28, 2021 8:48 am

I've just started the Texas Spring 2021 Forum: viewtopic.php?f=24&t=121735


Winter 2020-2021 was thought to be a Mild one, especially across the Southern Plains, but Jack Frost ( :slime: ) had other Ideas . . . :eek:

All of the storms in Winter 2020-2021 :darrow:

October 2020 Ice Storm
December 2020 Triple Snowstorms (Including the December 30th Surprise Snowstorm :eek: )
New Year's Day Storm (2020-2021)
February 2021 Polar Vortex (Cold of the Century) :froze: :jacket:
February 2021 Double Trouble Snowstorms (1st one was the Storm of the Century) :shocked!: :yow:

WHAT A WINTER!
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Bill 2015 & Beta 2020

Winter 2020-2021 :jacket:

Also many Oklahoma Supercells

Winter posts are focused mainly for Oklahoma & Texas

My posts are NOT endorsed by S2K, NWS or NHC. Please look up the SPC, NHC & NWS for more info.

Never say Never with weather! Especially in Oklahoma . . .

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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7591 Postby jasons2k » Mon Mar 01, 2021 11:32 pm

richtrav wrote:
psyclone wrote:Any insight as to the extent of damage to the hardy (and not so hardy) palms and semi tropical plants in coastal/south Texas? That was some insane cold, even for tougher species. I know there are some royal palms down around Brownsville and they really don't like cold.


Yeah I can answer that. It is turning out to be pretty hard on them, you are right they don’t like it. Large royal palms in the middle of Brownsville have the best shot at making it, they had the warmest minima (24 at one downtown site) and were in that critical mid-20s range for less time than the rest of the area. Even there they have badly burned foliage but at least there is more green left in the stems. If they’re too far gone the tissue in the stem dies causing the leaf to collapse. They may or may not recover, we were flirting with what their extermination point was in Florida in the 1980s. Other tropical palms that are not as sturdy are gone, their skinnier trunks are already bleeding sap. Pygmy dates are burned even in Brownsville, I don’t know how many will survive, probably the majority of ones not fully exposed to the elements, they’re a bit tougher. Aside from palms the most tender stuff is going to take a big hit either to the ground or large diameter wood (royal poincianas, ornamental figs, mangoes, avocados, etc).

North of inner Brownsville the damage is extending into more subtropical plants as well. Some plants that are completely safe most winters (such as queen palms) have recently begun to show scorch but it’s variable and uneven, some look decent while others are straw. Same with ponytails and tropical yucca. These should recover. Citrus got scorched in the fields but they hopefully will not have extensive wood damage, in yards they look a lot better except for the limes. All in all this is consistent with some of the hardest freezes from the first half of the 20th century, when the citrus industry in the state was forced south of the King Ranch. Back then frosts were more frequent and true tropicals were planted on a more limited basis, with people preferring subtropicals that could take a little cold. At this time most subtropicals (bottlebrushes, eucalypts, Mexican fan palms, kapoks/shaving brush trees, etc) appear to have survived a brush with death. But tender shrubs like crotons or ixoras will have to be replaced if they weren’t covered. Frost cloth and/or thick painter’s plastic worked wonders on tropicals if they could be covered from top to bottom, no heating was needed.

The good news is that the area doesn’t look post-apocalyptic the way it did after the disaster of the 1983 freeze. This was more like 1930. Now north of the King Ranch the damage to tender and semi-hardy unprotected plants is probably going to be much more extensive given their lows.

It’s good to see you around again and thanks for the update. It was rough here in Southern Montgomery County. Most Mexican fan palms are fully bronzed. It’s gonna be close for them. Sagos and Canary Island dates are fully bronzed too. This killed off the last of the queen palms and several others in that range. The sabals and pindos look untouched.
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Re: Texas Winter 2020-2021

#7592 Postby Ntxw » Mon Mar 08, 2021 4:01 pm

Just FYI we have moved to the Spring thread. However there is a potential threat of some Springtime cold with maybe frozen precipitation for some areas mid month.

http://www.storm2k.org/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?f=24&t=121735&start=80
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