Request info. Miller A Storm

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wobblehead
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Request info. Miller A Storm

#1 Postby wobblehead » Tue Oct 17, 2006 8:27 pm

To All,
donsutherland1 posted his winter weather outlook and in his discussion he made reference to a "Miller A Storm". What is a Miller A storm?
I recall many winters ago a bomb of a low that pushed west to east across the northern half of the GOM and pounded a portion of the west coast of Florida with hurricane like conditions. I wonder if this storm was an example of a Miller A storm.
Pardon my ignorance but I am always wanting to learn so thanks for any info.
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#2 Postby wxmann_91 » Wed Oct 18, 2006 2:43 am

A Miller A type snowstorm has a low which originates in the Gulf; it intensifies and races up the east coast. EX: Superstorm 1993, Blizzard of 1996. These tend to be more widespread in area BUT can be less favorable for historic snows in New England. However, they can clobber portions of the Mid-Atlantic.

A Miller B type snowstorm has a primary low over the Appalachians while a new, secondary, and more powerful low spins up along the Gulf Stream waters off the coast of NC. It intensifies and depending on its track can clobber areas of inland or coastal New England. These are less widespread in terms of area and usually miss the Mid-Atlantic. EX: Blizzard of 2005.
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#3 Postby bob rulz » Wed Oct 18, 2006 3:51 pm

So they're essentially two different types of Nor'Easter?
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#4 Postby wxmann_91 » Wed Oct 18, 2006 5:34 pm

Bingo, Bob.
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#5 Postby wobblehead » Wed Oct 18, 2006 9:12 pm

Well now thats interesting. Thank you for the explanation. I'm familiar with the Nor'Easter weather event. If I understand correctly a Miller A storm could cause a rare snow fall here on the Alabama coast if the low tracked far enough north along the coast here and cold air was in place.
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#6 Postby wxmann_91 » Thu Oct 19, 2006 6:12 pm

wobblehead wrote:Well now thats interesting. Thank you for the explanation. I'm familiar with the Nor'Easter weather event. If I understand correctly a Miller A storm could cause a rare snow fall here on the Alabama coast if the low tracked far enough north along the coast here and cold air was in place.


Yep. The most extreme example of that would the Superstorm of 93.
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#7 Postby Stephanie » Fri Oct 20, 2006 8:25 pm

I always get the origins of the two confused. I have to remember the Superstorm and Blizzard of 96 as the examples.

Last year was a BIG YEAR for Miller B type storms for the New England area. They were clobbered and I missed them by about 100 miles. :lol: Either type of storm though usually produces a good snow fall for us - as long as it stays off shore.
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Re: Request info. Miller A Storm

#8 Postby CrazyC83 » Wed Nov 21, 2007 2:22 pm

Those setups tend to often bring severe weather/winter weather on different sides of fronts as well, correct? (Example: February 28-March 1 this year)
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Re: Request info. Miller A Storm

#9 Postby jimvb » Sun Jan 25, 2009 7:37 am

What is a Miller C Storm? The discussion for Wakefield, VA, refers to it:

GFS/ECMWF CONTINUE TO
SHOW INDICATIONS OF A MILLER STORM TYPE "C" PATTERN SOLN
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Re: Request info. Miller A Storm

#10 Postby JBG » Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:37 pm

jimvb wrote:What is a Miller C Storm? The discussion for Wakefield, VA, refers to it:

GFS/ECMWF CONTINUE TO
SHOW INDICATIONS OF A MILLER STORM TYPE "C" PATTERN SOLN

Answer? Link?

I am now curious on what a "Miller C" storm is.
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Re: Request info. Miller A Storm

#11 Postby jimvb » Mon Jun 01, 2009 3:46 pm

On 2009 February 17, I asked Jim Duncan's (WWBT-12, Richmond, Va.) blog what a Miller C was. I got this response:

Jim VB Says:

February 18, 2009 at 12:21 am | Reply
David, I think I have seen the terms used before. I get the impression that a Miller B storm is similar to an Alberta clipper. I have also heard a Miller C storm described, but I can’t find anywhere which says what that is. What is a Miller C Storm?

David Tuck Says:

February 18, 2009 at 12:27 am | Reply
I have never heard of a Miller C storm. A Miller B usually does us no good. It usually starts as a clipper that redevelops off the east coast, but usually it’s too far north to help us. Our big storms are almost always Miller A’s or we can sometimes get 1-3″ from a clipper, but usually the mountains eat ‘em up. BTW, the 0z GFS trends towards the Euro and Canadian snowstorm, but still heads a bit offshore which is fine because that’s its bias. All of this information is available at Easternuswx.com.

However, the reference I quoted officially from NOAA explicitly mentions a Miller C storm. Apparently the concept is known well enough for a NOAA meteorologist to use it.
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#12 Postby brunota2003 » Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:01 pm

One thing you can do is email Wakefield and ask. I have a feeling it might be something between an A and a B
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Re:

#13 Postby JBG » Sun Jun 07, 2009 5:06 pm

brunota2003 wrote:One thing you can do is email Wakefield and ask. I have a feeling it might be something between an A and a B

What about e-mailing Miller him- or her-self?
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Re: Request info. Miller A Storm

#14 Postby jimvb » Wed Jun 10, 2009 6:45 pm

I just got a reply from Tony Siebers at NOAA. It reads:

There is no Miller C storm. I am pretty sure the reference should have been just to a "type C" pattern. An Albright and Cobb (2004) local study of Mid-Atlantic winter storms showed that there are five predominant patterns that produce four inches or more of snowfall across southeast Virginia and northeast North Carolina. These were defined as Type A through E. There is a paper published by Albright and Cobb in the 15th Conference on Weather Analysis and Forecasting title "Synoptic Scale Climatology of Heavy Snow Events in Southeastern Virignia 1960-1995."

There is also another reference: Albright, Wayne and Cobb, Hugh, 2004: Tying Mid-Atlantic Winter Storm Patterns to Composite Anomalies and Standard Deviations. This is a powerpoint that we could send you if you are interested.

Tony Siebers


this seems to suggest there isn't a Miller A or B storm either, but instead Albright and Cobb (or AC) Types A, B, C, D, and E. I could not find any reference to these on the Web, or at least when I googled such things as "albright and cobb type a b c d e".
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