New Product... Hurricane Panel Locks instead of Plylox

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toplayr
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New Product... Hurricane Panel Locks instead of Plylox

#1 Postby toplayr » Tue Jun 20, 2006 11:47 pm

Hello all,

I tried plylox and they scratched my window frame to bits!! :(

Plylox were also hard to setup because it had to be cut perfectly and as we all know windows are not always perfectly straight. In fact, they are usually slightly off making it harder to keep the locks straight and tight.

Another problem I find with plylox is that the plywood can only be 1/2" and it's just too thin. I've also found that using plylox to secure plywood on a larger window is not very stable at all.

I've found Hurricane Panel Locks are able to secure corrugated metal (which I used on my house) and plywood both easy and fast! I had no trouble aligning it and the Hurricane Panel Locks are a VERY sturdy and secure locking device. Once they are up they are not coming down until you take them down and they won't destroy your home like hammering or screwing plywood always does.

If you want to know where I got them here's their website.

http://www.hurricanepanellock.com/videos.html

They have video demonstrations on their webstie and it sold me. I have them installed and I am ready to go.

Thought I would post this and let others know about this new option. I looked for a long time for something to get ready and something affordable since I can't afford those expensive shutters.

Let me know what you guys think!
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Re: New Product... Hurricane Panel Locks instead of Plylox

#2 Postby GalvestonDuck » Wed Jun 21, 2006 7:11 am

toplayr wrote:I tried plylox and they scratched my window frame to bits!! :(


Plylox is meant to be used on brick, not wood, which is a problem here since hardly anyone owns a brick home on the coast.
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Re: New Product... Hurricane Panel Locks instead of Plylox

#3 Postby melhow » Wed Jun 21, 2006 7:36 am

GalvestonDuck wrote:
toplayr wrote:I tried plylox and they scratched my window frame to bits!! :(


Plylox is meant to be used on brick, not wood, which is a problem here since hardly anyone owns a brick home on the coast.


Plylox work fine on masonry as well. Does scratch the paint to shreds where the little teeth dig in when you pry to remove, but that touches up easily enough. Personally, I feel the fact that the teeth are giving so much resistance when you try to remove the panel is pretty reassuring.

I agree that the window panel does have to exactly to the specs of the window, and my husband was about ready to chuck the skill saw over the fence when we cut our boards initially- but the beauty is once your done, your done (as long as you seal your plywood).

I say again - I dig the plylox. I also say I hope I don't have to take them out of the hurricane box this season.
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#4 Postby HurriCat » Wed Jun 21, 2006 12:25 pm

What's with the MP4 videos? :roll: Oh well... Anyways, these are used to make "bars" that keep the panel material captive in the opening, right? Is the panel then right up against the window itself? If so, maybe no problem with the metal sheets (still on heavy side, sharp and a bit expensive), but with plywood - especially the 1/4" stuff, then maybe the flexing will still crack/break the glass(?). This is still a good idea, but maybe not for all windows.
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#5 Postby toplayr » Wed Jun 21, 2006 2:19 pm

I had no problem with the MP4 videos.

Yes, it right against the window and it's not a problem since it's touching the FRAME around the window and not the glass. It made a clean installation and it can be used with PLYWOOD or METAL. I like metal because it's lighter and easier to store. It lays flat against each other. My neighbor just bought them and he's using the Hurricane Panel Locks with 3/4" plywood.

I just think this is a great product and I was so happy to find something new. Hopefully I hope I don't need them!
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#6 Postby HurriCat » Wed Jun 21, 2006 3:07 pm

Yeah, I heard that about not needing them :eek: Maybe if I'd been able to watch the vids I'd have seen more of how they work. Looks like I need to upgrade the Quicktime player or something. Anyways, thanks for the tips - we need all the ideas we can get!
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Hurricane Panel Lock - Videos

#7 Postby toplayr » Wed Jun 21, 2006 6:12 pm

Hi again,

I contacted Hurricane Panel Locks... Very nice people. They told me that they recorded the videos with their digital camera and didn't know it would be a problem.

So, they changed the videos and it's now FLASH so you guys should be able to see them.

http://www.hurricanepanellock.com/videos.html

Happy viewing!
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#8 Postby scandan780 » Wed Jun 21, 2006 6:52 pm

Do you have to drill holes in your house? How is the 1 inch pipe used?

Seems like a good product for my needs. Is it easy to make and install? They should have the instructions on the web site.
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Holes?

#9 Postby toplayr » Wed Jun 21, 2006 7:50 pm

Do you have to drill holes in your house? How is the 1 inch pipe used?

Seems like a good product for my needs. Is it easy to make and install? They should have the instructions on the web site.


I had to put 4 screws on the sides and then I painted them so you can't see them at all.

The 1" pipe goes across the window with the Hurricane Panel Lock on one end. What you are buying are the LOCKS (that are spring loaded for easy installation). Then I bought 1" pipes to make the difference from the pipe and the with of my window. I had a 36" window then I cut a pipe 29" long (2 of them) and I was done with that window. Then I cut Corrugated Sheet Metal (you can use Plywood) to fit my window!

They have video instructions for installation. I got the link when I purchased the locks. Very easy to install. Took me very little time and once your done it's done! The instructions are very easy to follow and the videos are very clear and simple too.

It's a great product, I am sure you'll be happy with it. I know I am.
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#10 Postby SouthFloridawx » Wed Jun 21, 2006 7:54 pm

What if you have a window larger than that.... say 50+ inches in width.
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#11 Postby toplayr » Wed Jun 21, 2006 8:37 pm

No problem, I installed the hurricane Panel Locks on my 8' (96") sliding glass door and no problem at all. I remember them telling me that you can also put a LOCK vertically for added protection if you feel that you need it. :bday:
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#12 Postby Alladin » Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:48 pm

You can do the same thing with a couple of 2 x 4's. It would be far less expensive and much more secure. I'll pass on this product.
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Re: New Product... Hurricane Panel Locks instead of Plylox

#13 Postby Alladin » Wed Jun 21, 2006 10:27 pm

melhow wrote:...but the beauty is once your done, your done (as long as you seal your plywood).

I say again - I dig the plylox. I also say I hope I don't have to take them out of the hurricane box this season.
Indeed, that is very important. Even top quality exterior plywood will delaminate if it gets soaked in hurricane force winds. Of course, most people (like me) buy the "cheap" plywood for shutters. Less expensive plywood has more voids, so when you cut it to fit your windows, those voids are exposed and will collect moisture.

As you wisely pointed out, you must seal the plywood with exterior paint or polyurethane. I have used a high quality exterior polyurethane on all of my plywood shutters. It not only prevents delamination, but it also keeps the panels from warping, rot and insect damage while in storage.
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#14 Postby DanKellFla » Fri Jun 23, 2006 7:09 pm

I am a little unclear. Is it held in place by friction or by screws?
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#15 Postby Alladin » Fri Jun 23, 2006 8:54 pm

DanKellFla wrote:I am a little unclear. Is it held in place by friction or by screws?
It's held in place by friction. It's basically a glorified friction shower curtain rod. A couple of 2 x 4's cut just a tad bigger than the window opening and hammered into place would do the same job much better, be stronger, safer and would be far less expensive.
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#16 Postby DanKellFla » Sat Jun 24, 2006 7:43 am

OK. I don't ever see it getting widespread acceptance. Although, it is a great start. Using the 1" conduit is pretty cheap, and unlike wood it won't rot. It also takes up a lot less space. But that conduit can get heavy. If they could come up with something that sticks out of the frame to form a mechanical connection, then that would be promising. I guess a some PanelMates and some conduit with a notch that allow you to slide the conduit on and then turn it around to secure it. Of course, something has to be done to ensure that the conduit can't turn and fall off.

The biggest problem I see with the product is that durring a storm the storm panels/plywood will vibrate (High frequncy.. Low Amplitude) and occasionally fall out. This can be overcome by increasing the force applied, but then you are going to damage the area around the window.
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#17 Postby Alladin » Sat Jun 24, 2006 3:54 pm

DanKellFla wrote:OK. I don't ever see it getting widespread acceptance. Although, it is a great start. Using the 1" conduit is pretty cheap, and unlike wood it won't rot. It also takes up a lot less space. But that conduit can get heavy. If they could come up with something that sticks out of the frame to form a mechanical connection, then that would be promising. I guess a some PanelMates and some conduit with a notch that allow you to slide the conduit on and then turn it around to secure it. Of course, something has to be done to ensure that the conduit can't turn and fall off.

The biggest problem I see with the product is that durring a storm the storm panels/plywood will vibrate (High frequncy.. Low Amplitude) and occasionally fall out. This can be overcome by increasing the force applied, but then you are going to damage the area around the window.
As I have mentioned before, I prefer to use 15/32" plywood sheets with Plylox clips. I have found this system to be very effective for my brick house. However, prior to the advent of Plylox clips, I used another method that worked well on recessed window frames for brick and CBS structures.

You measure the wind frame and then cut three 2 x 4's just a tad bigger than the opening. You then place the 2 x 4's in the window frame (top, bottom and center) and tap them in place with a hammer until they're snug. You can then screw plywood sheets to the 2 x 4's. They will not come loose in hurricane force winds. When the 2 x 4's get wet (and they will get wet during the storm), they expand and hold even tighter!

The main problem with this panel lock device is that it not very effective and it costs way too much money! I have 10 windows I need to protect. Plylox recommends 4 clips per window, but to be extra safe, I'm using 6 clips per window. Therefore, I need 60 clips (3 bags) which cost me $90.00.

If I used these panel lock things, I would need at least 20 to do the job and they would cost me $500.00 plus shipping, tax and then I also have to buy the 1" pipe to make the things work! No thanks, this is not a good idea (except for the company that sells them).
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#18 Postby Tstormwatcher » Mon Jun 26, 2006 4:16 pm

What if your windows are flush with your alumimun siding?
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#19 Postby Alladin » Mon Jun 26, 2006 7:08 pm

Tstormwatcher wrote:What if your windows are flush with your alumimun siding?
It depends upon what is under the aluminum siding (wood, CBS, brick?). For any window that is flush with the exterior wall, you will need to fashion some sort of standoff to keep the shutter away from the glass. For example, you could frame the window with 2 x 4's on all sides and then secure your shutter to the 2 x 4 frame.

If you have wood under the aluminum siding, then you just have to make sure that you secure your framework to the major studs behind the sidng.
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#20 Postby toplayr » Fri Aug 04, 2006 1:15 am

The biggest problem I see with the product is that durring a storm the storm panels/plywood will vibrate (High frequncy.. Low Amplitude) and occasionally fall out. This can be overcome by increasing the force applied, but then you are going to damage the area around the window.


Not so... There's a screw on each end and the pipe is flush against the panels. The pipe once locked tight can't fall off. No vibrations either since it's tight and flush.[/quote]
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